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Suite 301
Austin, TX 78705


Dripping Springs Office
13830 Sawyer Ranch Road
Suite 301
Dripping Springs, TX 78620


512-212-4670

512-233-5830 (fax)

info@carmahealth.com

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2017-06-14

Coping with Trauma during Addiction Recovery

Trauma is a part of life, whether we’re in recovery or not. Very few, if any of us, live charmed enough lives where we’re insulated from at least a few traumatic experiences. Whether it’s the death of a loved one, a violent physical attack, persistent emotional or lifestyle stress or anything else, we have to allow for the reality that trauma touches everyone and that some day it might touch us. Those of us in recovery have to be doubly mindful of the possibility that trauma and PTSD could trigger relapse and do everything we can to make sure we’re emotionally stable and protected from a setback.

Protecting ourselves from trauma-related relapse begins and ends with following our post-treatment recovery plan. We should have designated loved ones on whom we can lean in times of crisis. These people, ideally, will understand what we have been through and why we may be especially fragile in the wake of trauma. In treatment, we develop coping strategies to deal with stressors and triggers for a reason. The time to rely on these tools the most is when we’re at our most vulnerable. We can also reach out to our sponsors or go to an extra meeting or two if we feel like we need some extra help.

The reality is that the recovery process is often full of trauma: severed relationships, bad memories, physical and emotional illness, etc. Unfortunately, it may take a long time to develop the emotional strength required to deal with this trauma without compromising our emotional health. The first step to making sure we’re OK is using the resources we gained in treatment and letting someone know that we might be vulnerable in the wake of a traumatic experience. None of us have to do this alone, nor are we able to.

2017-06-14

Coping with Trauma during Addiction Recovery

Trauma is a part of life, whether we’re in recovery or not. Very few, if any of us, live charmed enough lives where we’re insulated from at least a few traumatic experiences. Whether it’s the death of a loved one, a violent physical attack, persistent emotional or lifestyle stress or anything else, we have to allow for the reality that trauma touches everyone and that some day it might touch us. Those of us in recovery have to be doubly mindful of the possibility that trauma and PTSD could trigger relapse and do everything we can to make sure we’re emotionally stable and protected from a setback.

Protecting ourselves from trauma-related relapse begins and ends with following our post-treatment recovery plan. We should have designated loved ones on whom we can lean in times of crisis. These people, ideally, will understand what we have been through and why we may be especially fragile in the wake of trauma. In treatment, we develop coping strategies to deal with stressors and triggers for a reason. The time to rely on these tools the most is when we’re at our most vulnerable. We can also reach out to our sponsors or go to an extra meeting or two if we feel like we need some extra help.

The reality is that the recovery process is often full of trauma: severed relationships, bad memories, physical and emotional illness, etc. Unfortunately, it may take a long time to develop the emotional strength required to deal with this trauma without compromising our emotional health. The first step to making sure we’re OK is using the resources we gained in treatment and letting someone know that we might be vulnerable in the wake of a traumatic experience. None of us have to do this alone, nor are we able to.