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630 West 34th Street
Suite 301
Austin, TX 78705


Dripping Springs Office
13830 Sawyer Ranch Road
Suite 301
Dripping Springs, TX 78620


512-212-4670

512-233-5830 (fax)

info@carmahealth.com

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2017-06-01

The Importance of Family in Addiction Recovery

Over 23 million Americans suffer from sort of addiction or substance use disorder for which treatment is recommended. Almost every one of these individuals has a whole group of family and friends that suffer right alongside them. Whether they’ve actually witnessed an addicted loved one succumb to drug overdose or they’re forced to watch them slowly decline into alcohol dependency, families have more power than they may realize in guiding their loved ones toward treatment and subsequent recovery. In many cases, the family may be the only thing standing between an addict’s long-term success and a lifetime of relapse. Families should keep this reality in mind when they feel powerless against their loved one’s drug or alcohol habit.

One of the most powerful weapons in a family’s arsenal is the weapon of prevention and early detection. There is, perhaps, no more qualified group of people to assess changes in a burgeoning addict’s behavior than the family with whom the addict lives and interacts on a daily basis. Parents, spouses, siblings and significant others are uniquely positioned to detect behavioral deviations and intervene accordingly, whether this means actual organized intervention or a simple conversation and the setting of boundaries. It may be harder or less comfortable than we’d like, but we, as families, have the power and the responsibility to support our loved ones in recovery.

As modern addiction treatment has evolved more and more, the family unit has become an integral part of the process. Facilities routinely offer family education programs to help participants understand the disease of addiction (how it alters brain chemistry, where cravings originate, etc.) and their role in their loved one’s subsequent recovery. Addiction hits families the hardest and most direct. When and if this happens, we can either cower in fear and resign of ourselves to inaction or we can rally and use our proximity to the situation to our advantage. In other words, helping an addicted loved one can either tear families apart or bring them closer together.

2017-06-01

The Importance of Family in Addiction Recovery

Over 23 million Americans suffer from sort of addiction or substance use disorder for which treatment is recommended. Almost every one of these individuals has a whole group of family and friends that suffer right alongside them. Whether they’ve actually witnessed an addicted loved one succumb to drug overdose or they’re forced to watch them slowly decline into alcohol dependency, families have more power than they may realize in guiding their loved ones toward treatment and subsequent recovery. In many cases, the family may be the only thing standing between an addict’s long-term success and a lifetime of relapse. Families should keep this reality in mind when they feel powerless against their loved one’s drug or alcohol habit.

One of the most powerful weapons in a family’s arsenal is the weapon of prevention and early detection. There is, perhaps, no more qualified group of people to assess changes in a burgeoning addict’s behavior than the family with whom the addict lives and interacts on a daily basis. Parents, spouses, siblings and significant others are uniquely positioned to detect behavioral deviations and intervene accordingly, whether this means actual organized intervention or a simple conversation and the setting of boundaries. It may be harder or less comfortable than we’d like, but we, as families, have the power and the responsibility to support our loved ones in recovery.

As modern addiction treatment has evolved more and more, the family unit has become an integral part of the process. Facilities routinely offer family education programs to help participants understand the disease of addiction (how it alters brain chemistry, where cravings originate, etc.) and their role in their loved one’s subsequent recovery. Addiction hits families the hardest and most direct. When and if this happens, we can either cower in fear and resign of ourselves to inaction or we can rally and use our proximity to the situation to our advantage. In other words, helping an addicted loved one can either tear families apart or bring them closer together.