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Central Austin Office
630 West 34th Street
Suite 301
Austin, TX 78705


Dripping Springs Office
13830 Sawyer Ranch Road
Suite 301
Dripping Springs, TX 78620


512-212-4670

512-233-5830 (fax)

info@carmahealth.com

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2017-07-18

Is Probuphine Right for Me?

In May of 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a long-acting injectable form of buprenorphine to help patients recover from opioid addiction. Probuphine is an implant that goes into patients’ arms and its effects are designed to last for about six months. It is the first drug of its kind approved for use in the United States, and many from the clinical and prevention communities claim that it represents the future of medication-assisted treatment. Like all opioid maintenance drugs, however, it comes with its own set of risks and effects of which potential users should be mindful. Some of the more common effects of Probuphine can include:

  • Headache
  • Depression
  • Vomiting
  • Back Pain
  • Nausea
  • Tooth Pain
  • Constipation

The scope and severity of these symptoms will vary based upon each patient’s individual medical issues and addiction history. Probuphine should not be used without doctor supervision.

While the drug’s potential for diversion is severely limited based on the method in which it is administered, Probuphine can still render patients tolerant and vulnerable to withdrawal symptoms. If withdrawal symptoms start to occur, it’s imperative that patients contact their prescribing physicians. It’s also important to note that Probuphine is not meant to replace or supplant any other element of treatment like behavioral therapy or detox.

Probuphine signals a potentially game-changing approach to medication-assisted treatment and addiction care in general. It takes much of the worry for abuse and recreational distribution out of the equation and creates a controlled and safe means of withdrawal and craving management. It is not, however, an all-in-one quick fix for chemical dependency. Recovery is a lifelong endeavor and drugs like Probuphine, however helpful in day-to-day management of symptoms, are only part of the treatment equation. If you or a loved one think you may be a candidate for Probuphine or any other type of treatment medication, talk to your doctor or a treatment specialist immediately to start the healing process.

2017-07-18

Is Probuphine Right for Me?

In May of 2016, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a long-acting injectable form of buprenorphine to help patients recover from opioid addiction. Probuphine is an implant that goes into patients’ arms and its effects are designed to last for about six months. It is the first drug of its kind approved for use in the United States, and many from the clinical and prevention communities claim that it represents the future of medication-assisted treatment. Like all opioid maintenance drugs, however, it comes with its own set of risks and effects of which potential users should be mindful. Some of the more common effects of Probuphine can include:

  • Headache
  • Depression
  • Vomiting
  • Back Pain
  • Nausea
  • Tooth Pain
  • Constipation

The scope and severity of these symptoms will vary based upon each patient’s individual medical issues and addiction history. Probuphine should not be used without doctor supervision.

While the drug’s potential for diversion is severely limited based on the method in which it is administered, Probuphine can still render patients tolerant and vulnerable to withdrawal symptoms. If withdrawal symptoms start to occur, it’s imperative that patients contact their prescribing physicians. It’s also important to note that Probuphine is not meant to replace or supplant any other element of treatment like behavioral therapy or detox.

Probuphine signals a potentially game-changing approach to medication-assisted treatment and addiction care in general. It takes much of the worry for abuse and recreational distribution out of the equation and creates a controlled and safe means of withdrawal and craving management. It is not, however, an all-in-one quick fix for chemical dependency. Recovery is a lifelong endeavor and drugs like Probuphine, however helpful in day-to-day management of symptoms, are only part of the treatment equation. If you or a loved one think you may be a candidate for Probuphine or any other type of treatment medication, talk to your doctor or a treatment specialist immediately to start the healing process.