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Central Austin Office
630 West 34th Street
Suite 301
Austin, TX 78705


Dripping Springs Office
13830 Sawyer Ranch Road
Suite 301
Dripping Springs, TX 78620


512-212-4670

512-233-5830 (fax)

info@carmahealth.com

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2017-09-06

A Message to Our Friends and Neighbors in Houston and Surrounding Areas about Long-Term Trauma

With the most immediate dangers of Hurricane Harvey in our state’s rearview, an entire population of people are left to pick up the pieces of their lives, rebuild their homes and ensure their families’ health and safety. Although the flood waters are receding and people are slowly starting to trickle back into their homes to assess the enormous tasks before them, the long-term everyday struggles will likely persist for quite some time. In addition to the immediate public health issues that Harvey created, including decimation of healthcare infrastructure, unsafe living conditions lack of access to treatment medications, etc., the trauma and mental health issues that these events often create can be just as dangerous.

The relationship between trauma-related mental illness and substance abuse has been well documented, and the likelihood of PTSD is significantly compounded after these types of events. After Hurricane Katrina, suicide rates as well cases of PTSD and overall mental illness climbed considerably, with only a fraction of those who needed treatment actually receiving it. While the most important thing after a disaster of this magnitude is to find one’s footing and get to work rebuilding, it’s also critical to monitor the long-term impact it’s taken on you and the people you care about. Do not be afraid to feel vulnerable and to seek treatment whenever possible.

Prolonged and untreated trauma can, and very often does, lead to drug and alcohol abuse. We are also mindful of the struggle that those in recovery are facing in maintaining their routine and gaining access to their maintenance medications. If you’re feeling especially vulnerable to relapse, reach out to your support system to try and get back on track. Remember that no storm can outlast you and there is a better future around the corner. Our thoughts and prayers continue be with our fellow Texans during the ongoing Harvey recovery effort.

2017-09-06

A Message to Our Friends and Neighbors in Houston and Surrounding Areas about Long-Term Trauma

With the most immediate dangers of Hurricane Harvey in our state’s rearview, an entire population of people are left to pick up the pieces of their lives, rebuild their homes and ensure their families’ health and safety. Although the flood waters are receding and people are slowly starting to trickle back into their homes to assess the enormous tasks before them, the long-term everyday struggles will likely persist for quite some time. In addition to the immediate public health issues that Harvey created, including decimation of healthcare infrastructure, unsafe living conditions lack of access to treatment medications, etc., the trauma and mental health issues that these events often create can be just as dangerous.

The relationship between trauma-related mental illness and substance abuse has been well documented, and the likelihood of PTSD is significantly compounded after these types of events. After Hurricane Katrina, suicide rates as well cases of PTSD and overall mental illness climbed considerably, with only a fraction of those who needed treatment actually receiving it. While the most important thing after a disaster of this magnitude is to find one’s footing and get to work rebuilding, it’s also critical to monitor the long-term impact it’s taken on you and the people you care about. Do not be afraid to feel vulnerable and to seek treatment whenever possible.

Prolonged and untreated trauma can, and very often does, lead to drug and alcohol abuse. We are also mindful of the struggle that those in recovery are facing in maintaining their routine and gaining access to their maintenance medications. If you’re feeling especially vulnerable to relapse, reach out to your support system to try and get back on track. Remember that no storm can outlast you and there is a better future around the corner. Our thoughts and prayers continue be with our fellow Texans during the ongoing Harvey recovery effort.